Jones honored for his 'Heart & Hustle'

Jones honored for his 'Heart & Hustle'

ANAHEIM -- The Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association announced Tuesday that Adam Jones has been named the Orioles 2014 Heart & Hustle Award winner.

The award honors active players who demonstrate a passion for the game of baseball and best embody the values, spirit and tradition of the game. The Heart & Hustle Award is also the only award in Major League Baseball that is voted on by former players.

"A couple years ago I remember Buck [Showalter] getting on my tail for not giving 110 percent, and it's made me give 150 now," Jones said.

"I appreciate [the award]. Just want to do my part to help the team. I'm glad to see that people see that, not just myself but my team, we go out there every single day and give it our all."

"He represents all the best qualities of a teammate and competitor," said Brooks Robinson, Orioles Hall of Fame third baseman and Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association president in a press release. "The way he plays the game sets an example for young players to follow."

The MLBPAA formed 30 committees, comprised of alumni players with established relationships to each team. One player from each Major League team is chosen by the committees based on their passion, desire and work ethic demonstrated both on and off the field. These players will be recognized prior to an upcoming home game. As the season draws to a close, fans, all alumni and active players will vote to select the final winner from the 30 team winners. The previous overall winners are David Eckstein (2005), Craig Biggio (2006, 2007), Grady Sizemore (2008), Albert Pujols (2009), Roy Halladay (2010), Torii Hunter (2011), Mike Trout (2012) and Dustin Pedroia (2013).

The final winner will be announced on November 18,2014 at the 15th Annual Legends for Youth Dinner in New York City. This event is the primary fundraiser for the series of free Legends for Youth Baseball Clinics. These clinics impact more than 15,000 children each year at 110 clinics, allowing them the unique opportunity to interact with and learn from players who have left a lasting impact on the game of baseball.

Brittany Ghiroli is a reporter for MLB.com. Read her blog, Britt's Bird Watch, and follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.