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Trembley knows his role will change

Trembley knows his role will change

BALTIMORE -- The new approach starts with the next game and should carry over into next year. Baltimore manager Dave Trembley learned Friday that he'll get to reprise his role next season, and after a celebratory victory over Toronto, he'll get his first chance to move forward with his new managerial style on Saturday.

Gone are the days of development on the job, and Trembley knows that he has to expect more from his players and himself. The expectations are about to rise demonstrably at Camden Yards, and Trembley knows that if the Orioles are going to win, he has to be more of a disciplinarian and less of a teacher on the field.

"I know what I have to do better," said Trembley of his approach. "I've got to drop the hammer more. I've got to drop it. Because losing does not sit very well with the people around here anymore. And I almost paid the ultimate price for that, and so did a lot of other people. That's it in a nutshell, probably more than a nutshell."

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That "win now" mentality will be tested in the final two games of the season, with the Orioles playing largely to avoid a record-based indignity. Baltimore hasn't lost 100 games since the epic collapse of the 1988 season, and with a victory over the Blue Jays in either of the last two games, the Orioles can keep that trend alive.

Another trend -- Baltimore's 12 straight losing seasons -- is already gone by the wayside. The Orioles can't do anything to combat their record until next season, but now they know who will be leading them into battle. Trembley admitted that he had spent a lot of time wondering about his fate, a concern that he can now forget about.

"We can move on now," said Trembley. "I don't have to be wondering what the heck somebody else is thinking or what the [heck] somebody's going to say. This reinforces what I believe, and I think the players understand, too. I've had great support from the players. Great, tremendous. But they're in for a little bit different approach in Spring Training. I want to thank everybody for what they've done for me. It's tremendous."

Pitching matchup
BAL: LHP Mark Hendrickson (5-5, 4.38 ERA)
Hendrickson goes into his final start of the season on the heels of his best stretch of 2009. His only two quality starts have come in his past two outings, and his best game of the season came in a no-decision against the Rays on Monday. In that start, the lefty gave up three runs on three hits and a walk while striking out three.

TOR: RHP Scott Richmond (8-10, 5.35 ERA)
Richmond worked six innings of four-run ball last Monday despite allowing a career-high three home runs in a victory over the Red Sox. The 30-year-old has won back-to-back starts for the first time since reeling off four successive wins from April 15 to May 3. In two appearances against the Orioles, Richmond is 2-0 with a 3.75 ERA.

Bird bites
Baltimore's 13-run outburst on Friday night was the first time it had scored in double digits since Sept. 15 and the first time it had scored 13 or more since Aug. 28. ... Brian Roberts set a new career high by scoring his 108th run on Friday night. ... Cesar Izturis tied a season high with three hits on Friday night. ... Michael Aubrey had the first multihomer game of his career and set a new career high in RBIs (six) in the victory over Toronto. ... Baltimore is 37-42 at home and 25-56 on the road this season. ... The Orioles are 49-53 when they hit at least one home run. ... Baltimore is 41-36 when it scores first and 21-62 when its opponent draws first blood. The Orioles are also 55-38 when they score at least four runs and 7-60 when they aren't able to score that many.

Tickets
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On the Internet
 MLB.TV
 Gameday Audio
•  Gameday
•  Official game notes

On television
• MASN HD

On radio
• 105.7 The Fan

Up next
• Sunday: Orioles (Jeremy Guthrie, 10-17, 5.05) vs. Blue Jays (Ricky Romero, 13-9, 4.26), 1:35 p.m. ET

Spencer Fordin is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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