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Jones sidelined with broken left foot

Jones sidelined with broken left foot

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ANAHEIM -- Adam Jones had his momentum stalled by an injury on Tuesday, when the Orioles learned that their center fielder had suffered a fractured left foot earlier in the week. Baltimore placed the 23-year-old on the disabled list, retroactive to Aug. 3, before Tuesday's game and purchased the contract of Luis Montanez from Double-A Bowie to fill his spot.

Jones injured himself by fouling a ball off his foot in Saturday's game, and the Orioles pushed him through a battery of tests that included a standard X-ray and a CT scan. The early returns were bad enough that they sent him on a flight back to Baltimore late Monday night, ostensibly to meet with doctors and plot his path to a full recovery.

"He's going to be on crutches for two weeks," said Baltimore manager Dave Trembley. "I believe at the end of three weeks, he's going to get another CT scan and we'll see where we're at. I think he's looking at a minimum of four weeks out. He's supposed to keep the [walking] boot on and stay on crutches. I really can't describe what the injury is because I'm not medically inclined. But it's a terrible thing for him and our team. I think the world of him. I hope he gets it taken care of."

Jones, who hit .323 in June and .280 in July, was unavailable for comment on Tuesday -- both to the press and to his manager. Trembley said he attempted to contact him and wasn't able to get in touch, but he related the substance of a closed-door conversation held shortly before Jones left for Baltimore on Monday night.

"We tried to prepare him for the possibility that he was probably going to go on the DL," said Trembley. "Just like he said, there's nothing he can do about it. It stinks, but that's baseball. All I can say is he's one tough son of a gun. [And] the way he ran in that game on Saturday on those balls he hit in the infield ought to tell you something about him."

Jones, who was acquired as part of a five-player bounty for Erik Bedard last winter, may need to do a rehab stint in the Minor Leagues once he completes his stint on the disabled list. It's entirely possible that he's played his last Major League game of the season, but Trembley didn't want to guess at his prognosis until he had more information.

"I don't know," he said of the ideal recovery. "I think we have to get to the point where he follows the protocol. In three weeks, I think that's the time when he gets the CT scan. Until then, there's no baseball activity for three weeks."

The Orioles pushed southpaw Adam Loewen to the 60-day disabled list to make room for Montanez on the 40-man roster before making the transaction. Montanez, the third overall selection in the 2000 First-Year Player Draft, was leading the Double-A Eastern League in batting average (.335), home runs (26) and RBIs (97) at the time of his promotion.

Trembley said that Montanez is capable of playing center field, but he didn't say how he intends to use him. The manager did allow that he hasn't considered using Nick Markakis in center, which all but cedes the everyday job to Jay Payton. But even at that proposition, Trembley held his cards close to the vest and tried not to divulge his proposed rotation.

"I would say Jay Payton with his experience will get an opportunity to play probably more than he has," he said cryptically. "I don't really like to say how much somebody is going to play, how much somebody isn't going to play."

Spencer Fordin is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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