CLOSE

Now Commenting On:

O's to resume Sox game on Aug. 25

Monday's game resumes Aug. 25

BALTIMORE -- Persistent rain in Chicago on Monday not only caused the game between the White Sox and Orioles to be suspended after 11 innings with the score knotted at 3. The storm also cost the White Sox home-field advantage when the game will be resumed -- almost four months from now.

The game will pick up in the top of the 12th inning on Monday, Aug. 25, at 6:05 p.m. ET before the start of the first game of a three-game series between the two clubs at Camden Yards. The four-game weekend series at U.S. Cellular Field marked the Orioles' lone trip to Chicago to face the White Sox this season, which necessitated the unusual arrangement.

Though Baltimore is scheduled to play an Interleague series against the Cubs from June 24-26, the resumption of the suspended game will occur in an American League park, it was announced Tuesday. Tickets for the suspended game are valid for the Aug. 25 game.

More

The start of Monday's game was delayed two hours, six minutes due to rain, and once play commenced, the umpiring crew tried to squeeze as much play in as possible before the field became unplayable.

The Orioles tied the game in the ninth inning on Melvin Mora's RBI single off Chicago closer Bobby Jenks and the teams traded runs in the 11th -- Ramon Hernandez's home run gave Baltimore a lead before the White Sox's Juan Uribe homered off the Orioles' George Sherrill -- before the field was deemed too sloppy to continue.

"This is the last time the Orioles and the White Sox meet here," said crew chief Rick Reed. "It was up to us to make every effort to get the game in, which I think we did by playing 11 innings. We feel that we gave them every chance to do that. Unfortunately, they kept tying the game up and nobody could win in regulation. And then the field just became unplayable."

Baltimore will play without designated hitter Aubrey Huff when the game resumes. Huff was ejected in the 10th for arguing after being called out on a close play at first base.

Pete Kerzel is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Less