Machado's feet start O's second triple-play feat

Third baseman runs to bag, makes nice throw to second as Orioles go around the horn

Machado's feet start O's second triple-play feat

BALTIMORE -- With the Orioles trailing after a pair of rain delays Thursday night, third baseman Manny Machado put some life back into the home dugout at Camden Yards. Machado started the O's second triple play of the season in the second inning of a 7-5 loss to the Tigers.

The Orioles went around the horn to help Chris Tillman escape another jam. Machado fielded James McCann's grounder, touching the third-base bag and firing to second baseman Jonathan Schoop. Schoop pivoted and tossed to first baseman Chris Davis just in front of a hustling McCann.

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"I don't know [how many triple plays I've witnessed]. I think the last one I saw was Ian Kinsler hit into a triple play a few years ago," Tigers manager Brad Ausmus said. "It happens, it's part of the game. You know, Machado really is the key to that, because he tags the base on the run and makes the perfect kind of three-quarters throw to second base."

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The 5-4-3 triple play was the O's first since May 2, when they turned the feat in the bottom of the eighth inning at Boston. And while it wowed the crowd at Camden Yards, it didn't do enough to change the momentum for Tillman, who didn't record an out in the third.

"It usually does [change the momentum]," Orioles manager Buck Showalter said, "but that gives you an indication of how much Chris is struggling with his command right now. Because usually, on paper, that's what happens."

• First Camden Yards triple play since 1992

O's turn two triple plays in '17

According to STATS, Thursday marked the second time in Orioles history (since 1954) that they have turned two triple plays in a season. The other was in 1973.

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.